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Coachella with surprises

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Offline lakeisle

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Reply #180 on: April 19, 2018, 09:01:53 AM
YÖS!

thx lakeisle

nb, you don't need livestreaming because you will sleep late and will not be able to come on time.  >:( >:( >:(



Offline LEMONedMe

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Reply #181 on: April 19, 2018, 09:33:05 AM
The time and the stage for the concert this weekend are the same as last weekend.

https://www.coachella.com/lineup/#/artist/x-japan

Sometimes our tears blinded the love
We lost out dreams along the way
But I never thought you'd trade your soul to the fates
Never thought you'd leave me alone


Offline matsumoto

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Reply #182 on: April 19, 2018, 11:02:54 AM
Hahaha! (featuring masaya)

It's off topic. But I wonder why Yoshiki wears a crucifix around his neck. At first, I thought he is a Catholic. But now I bet he is not a religious person. Sometimes he hangs sunglasses on his crucifix necklace.

Is it just a fashion item? Is it a symbol of anti-Christ?

LOL. I have a lot of unnecessary curiosity.

Someone once asked him that question during a Q&A session I attended here in France. He said he wore it simply because he thinks it's cool. I think the person also asked him if he was religious, he said something like "You know in Japan we have this Buddhist thing?". So... I guess he's probably a lowkey buddhist.

As for Christian-inspired paraphernalia, most Jrock bands seem rather obsessed with it. The Jealousy album (IRCC) has a picture of a Christian cross in lieu of Yoshiki's picture in the bandmembers section. Hide used to wear long coats with crosses on the back in the early 1990s as well. He once said in an interview that he attended Sunday school briefly as a child and really liked the aesthetics, but didn't understand the spiritual part. I guess our typical western symbols don't translate quite the same in the East. If you dig deep enough, you'll also find a lot of cringy outfits and salutes (examples: Hide wore the Nazi armband in the Saver Tiger days, there was a popular band called The Stalin in the 80s, Yoshiki posed in an erotic photoshoot with a guy wearing a Nazi-esque uniform, etc.) A lot of Western folks are shocked by this, but the truth is that Eastern folks don't associate these visuals with the same connotation as we do, or so it seems. They wear stuff because they think it looks cool, and that's about it.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 11:04:26 AM by matsumoto »

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Offline LEMONedMe

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Reply #183 on: April 19, 2018, 11:06:23 AM
Toshi has won a large cross, too.  I believe he is also Buddhist.

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We lost out dreams along the way
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Offline returner

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Reply #184 on: April 19, 2018, 02:23:20 PM
Yoshiki does talk about God in his lyrics. He might have said it was cool to wear the cross when asked about it but I can guarantee he didn't say he "simply wore it because it was cool."

Blind dance: Leave me in the place where I belong... On the other side, where God lead me.

Jade: Will God break my fall? And "makes me wanna dive in the color of Heaven"

Blue Butterfly: I cast my shadow into the will of God.

La Venus- Til we fly from here to Heaven

He has a song called Sex and Religion, Angel, and VUK-R's other title is God Bless You All.

Those are just some examples. Even if Angel and heaven can be used symbolically  they show up too much and in conjunction with his use of God to simply be that.

It's not really fair to ask celebrities about their religion unless they make it obvious they already are something... He does often say he's praying for victims of natural disasters and such via Twitter, too.

Edit: Nazi symbols are not as easily used even in Asia these days. To say it flat out means a different thing over there is an antiquated view. Back in the 80s it was more ok, and it definitely still isn't as offensive as it is in the west, but a kpop member would be eaten alive by netizens for wearing a Nazi uniform nowadays, for example.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 04:17:58 PM by returner »

We are not trying to keep the legacy—we are trying to move forward, so our sound is going to change. I’m ready to be criticized, for example by fans saying "you should rather be this style." I’m ready for it, I’m okay with any concept of criticism-Yoshiki


Offline pt_93

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Reply #185 on: April 19, 2018, 02:37:52 PM
I think he did say in that Q&A that he wore it because it’s cool but he also said he does believe in God and the person that asked the question was like “Well, I’m an atheist” lol but he has said before he doesn’t have an specific religion but he does believe in god and he also said he does some buddist rituals sometimes.



Offline matsumoto

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Reply #186 on: April 19, 2018, 04:53:36 PM
Edit: Nazi symbols are not as easily used even in Asia these days. To say it flat out means a different thing over there is an antiquated view. Back in the 80s it was more ok, and it definitely still isn't as offensive as it is in the west, but a kpop member would be eaten alive by netizens for wearing a Nazi uniform nowadays, for example.

Agree. Right now we live in a moment in history where East and West aren't blindly poking at each other anymore. It all gets way more real when it happens right next to you, but people know where the boundaries are. Back then, without the internet and without a certain level of cultural rapprochement, I can see why kids thought the Nazis and Stalin were cool stuff to throw into the mix. Pretty much like the West has long glamourized the samurai, geishas, the Russian tzar, Rasputin...   

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Offline returner

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Reply #187 on: April 19, 2018, 06:50:21 PM
Edit: Nazi symbols are not as easily used even in Asia these days. To say it flat out means a different thing over there is an antiquated view. Back in the 80s it was more ok, and it definitely still isn't as offensive as it is in the west, but a kpop member would be eaten alive by netizens for wearing a Nazi uniform nowadays, for example.

Agree. Right now we live in a moment in history where East and West aren't blindly poking at each other anymore. It all gets way more real when it happens right next to you, but people know where the boundaries are. Back then, without the internet and without a certain level of cultural rapprochement, I can see why kids thought the Nazis and Stalin were cool stuff to throw into the mix. Pretty much like the West has long glamourized the samurai, geishas, the Russian tzar, Rasputin...

Yup, exactly. The internet has done amazing things. The east looks more closely at western entertainment (thus society) now more than ever, and visa versa and, culturally, the two are growing more and more alike in the youth ranks. We will only continue to merge as time goes on.

We are not trying to keep the legacy—we are trying to move forward, so our sound is going to change. I’m ready to be criticized, for example by fans saying "you should rather be this style." I’m ready for it, I’m okay with any concept of criticism-Yoshiki


Offline nb

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Reply #188 on: April 19, 2018, 08:35:27 PM
a little bit of. but i'm very happy that x has no Hakenkreuze in it's history.

But look at these guys. Actually there are TWO ex-X Japan members in it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BmZ6Y6APUPQ


positively unsure。


Offline lakeisle

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Reply #189 on: April 20, 2018, 01:16:51 AM
I wanted to ask exactly that question. Thank you French fan! And thank you for letting me know about it, matsumoto.


As for Western folks and Eastern folks, I don't know much about Japanese entertainment industry because X Japan is the first and the only band I'm into(I'm learning Jrock and Jpop little by little though). But as a Korean, I'm very familiar with Korean entertainment industry. I agree with returner. If a kpop member wears Hakenkreuz, they would be harshly criticized. We learn about Nazism not only at school but also through books, movies and other media("The Diary of Anne Frank" is a must-read book. "La vita è bella" and "Schindler's List" are super famous).

However, the level of criticism due to wearing Hakenkreuz is nothing compared to the one they will receive when they wear "Rising Sun Flag". When a member of SNSD posted a Rising Sun Flag emoji on her snapchat, she was almost trampled by angry netizens. We have our own historical issues and respond right away to the stuffs directly related to our history. I mean, we understand the meaning of Nazi symbol over the head, but cannot feel it from the heart unlike the symbols that are related to our history directly.

Nevertheless, the Nazi symbol is a kind of taboo in our society as well.


Back to religion topic, last year, cheap comedy tv series were broadcast in Korea. The synopsis is that a man went to the Middle East and became a wealthy Count, and one day he happen to know that he had a daughter... such a story. The drama didn't get any attention until one day they announced the official apology. It's because they received tremendous protests from Muslims for the reason they made a joke about Islamic culture. They apologized in English and Arabic and deleted the footage from the VOD services, but anger of Muslims lasted long. Some people even went to the station and threatened that they could be terrorized if they do this again.


It was a shock to me. And I first learned the word "cultural appropriation". There is no Korean word for "cultural appropriation". We lack education and awareness about such things mainly because our society is not multicultural. I searched for English posts on "cultural appropriation" and found that many kpop idols were being blamed for dreadlocks, and the use of some Indian or Arabic images in their music videos. At first, it was very difficult for me to understand. But now, I'm kind of educated in some way.


We can say crucifix is a symbol of Catholic or Orthodox, right? But no one blames Yoshiki for using the necklaces as a fashion item. What if he used the symbol of Islam as an accessory? It's hard to imagine.

I still can't understand it. "cultural appropriation" does not apply to Christianity? 

I'm not blaming Yoshiki. I just can't understand the meaning of "cultural appropriation" perfectly.



+ I have a photo of Sugizo wearing a Nazi armband(holding a whip). But I am sure that Sugizo is very far from Nazism. Some people even call him "the left" because of his actions or remarks. Yes, Japanese rockstars do not seem to read much into the Western symbols.



Offline LEMONedMe

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Reply #190 on: April 20, 2018, 01:27:04 AM
lakeisle, are you positive that Sugzio is wearing a swastika?  Are you sure it's not a cross in the old fashion of many countries? I ask because as soon as I saw this all brought up in the topic, I remembered that the Nazi's butchered the meaning of the swastika and made it their symbol but it was not always just theirs.  In fact, it is an ancient symbol for many religions and cultures and I just read it is also used by Buddhists.

Sometimes our tears blinded the love
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Offline LEMONedMe

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Reply #191 on: April 20, 2018, 01:42:19 AM
See what I mean?

"Swastika
The swastika (卐) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four arms bent at 90 degrees. The earliest archaeological evidence of swastika-shaped ornaments dates back to the Indus Valley Civilization as well as the Mediterranean Classical Antiquity and paleolithic Europe. Swastikas have also been used in various other ancient civilizations around the world including Turkic, India, Iran, Nepal, China, Japan, Korea and Europe. It remains widely used in Indian religions, specifically in Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism, primarily as a tantric symbol that invokes Lakshmi - the Vedic goddess of wealth, prosperity and auspiciousness.

The word "swastika" comes from the Sanskrit svastika - "su" (meaning "good" or "auspicious") combined with "asti" (meaning "it is"), along with the diminutive suffix "ka." The swastika literally means "it is good." It is a common practice for Hindus to draw Swastika symbol on the doors and entrances to their houses during festivals, which is believed to symbolize an invitation to goddess Lakshmi. The name "sauwastika" is sometimes given to the left-facing arms symbol, which is a mirror image of swastika (卍)."


Sometimes our tears blinded the love
We lost out dreams along the way
But I never thought you'd trade your soul to the fates
Never thought you'd leave me alone


Offline LEMONedMe

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Reply #192 on: April 20, 2018, 02:05:06 AM
Well, it sounds like you are correct about Sugzio's outfit in the photo you have.  I wonder whatever possessed him to wear that? LOL

I really don't take it very seriously either.  What got me interested in all of this symbolism was that among my grandfather's belongings (he died years before I was born), I found a beaded belt with what I called swastikas going all the way around it and it shocked me.  I started doing some research on it because he was Slovak and immigrated to the USA before WWI ! So it couldn't have been Nazi, I think.  But what was it, then? Then I found out, Christians used the symbol as well but the cross arms go the opposite direction.   I was relieved when I looked at his belt and compared it to a Nazi swastika. Hahahahaha!

Sometimes our tears blinded the love
We lost out dreams along the way
But I never thought you'd trade your soul to the fates
Never thought you'd leave me alone


Offline LEMONedMe

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Reply #193 on: April 20, 2018, 02:05:43 AM
:o Where did your post go? lololololol

Sometimes our tears blinded the love
We lost out dreams along the way
But I never thought you'd trade your soul to the fates
Never thought you'd leave me alone


Offline Joker

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Reply #194 on: April 20, 2018, 02:16:01 AM
Well, it sounds like you are correct about Sugzio's outfit in the photo you have.  I wonder whatever possessed him to wear that? LOL

I remember reading an article about nazi symbols in visual kei bands. From what I remember, until mid 90's japanese poeple didn't have too much information about what nazism really was and some bands used swastikas just to "appear rebel", like if it was some kind of "punk" stuff.

Nowadays, we're living in a more "connected" world, information is more widespread and for years no visual kei band used nazi symbols anymore. I remember on XRD, another X-related site which received much contribution from Jun, they said Jun didn't like Rommel stuff to be shared because he didn't want to be seen as a nazi. I think same thing happened to Sugizo, who shows himself totally diferent from what a neonazi would be, often tweeting against wars, composing songs like "No More Machineguns" and "Enola gay", and even spending some time in Jordan helping Syrian refugees.



Offline LEMONedMe

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Reply #195 on: April 20, 2018, 02:26:30 AM
That's really informative info as well as what lakeisle posted, Joker.  Thanks!  :)

Sometimes our tears blinded the love
We lost out dreams along the way
But I never thought you'd trade your soul to the fates
Never thought you'd leave me alone


Teemeah

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Reply #196 on: April 20, 2018, 07:48:58 AM
Yeah, bunch of visual key artists dressed up sort of in a tweeked nazi uniform. It was apparently chic back in the day. Nowadays I think they would be publically executed for that by fans and non-fans alike.



Offline nb

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Reply #197 on: April 20, 2018, 07:52:03 AM
Well, it sounds like you are correct about Sugzio's outfit in the photo you have.  I wonder whatever possessed him to wear that? LOL

I remember reading an article about nazi symbols in visual kei bands. From what I remember, until mid 90's japanese poeple didn't have too much information about what nazism really was and some bands used swastikas just to "appear rebel", like if it was some kind of "punk" stuff.


I'm German. So there are no excuses and Germany was guilty of the massacre of the Jews and war with the whole world. We Germans know that very well and are very ashamed of it. Even though we had nothing to do with it, often not even our grandparents, but only our great-grandparents. But it has changed Germany a lot. We have been a Pacific nation ever since and are largely out of every war.
Now to Japan. Japan was an ally of Germany and thus fought for fascism, etc. The problem was the atomic bomb. Perpetrators suddenly became victims. Because Hiroshima and Nagasaki were so terrible that it was quickly forgotten what Japan actually did everything bad in World War II.

We know what we did. Therefore swastikas are completely forbidden in Germany and you get a lot trouble if you have a flag, even if you only have them in the drawer at home.
The Japanese never really had to deal with their Nazi past. And as is often the case, if you do not work your past, then you can not learn from it.

I think that's why Japanese bands in the 80s just chose the most provocative icons. Even now, there are still SS patches in regular T-shirt stores alongside Black Flag and Sex Pistols. And there are many stores that sell German militaria from the World War II in Japan.

This is probably more due to ignorance and not really because so many Japanese really found what Germany has initiated. I mean, there was fascism everywhere. Italy, Spain etc.

All the more I am glad that X did not commit this mistake. Otherwise they would never have had a chance in the West. At least not in Europe.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2018, 07:54:13 AM by nb »


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Offline matsumoto

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Reply #198 on: April 20, 2018, 10:01:18 AM
But look at these guys. Actually there are TWO ex-X Japan members in it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BmZ6Y6APUPQ

Ouch, those guys. This made me cringe so hard. I'm not the easily offended type, but my stomach acidity levels just went through the roof.  ???

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Offline lakeisle

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Reply #199 on: April 20, 2018, 11:04:59 AM
:o Where did your post go? lololololol

LEMONedMe,
sorry. I thought I deleted the post before someone read it. Hahahaha.
It was because of the problem that I talked to you before.  8)
(English)



Offline helenmoon

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Reply #200 on: April 20, 2018, 01:19:29 PM
As regards nazi symbols of course I think as well they were not used for their political meaning, but  because their sadomasochistic implications met somehow with some bands's topics (for exemple "Sadistic desire").
I was wondering whether Yoshiki and the band ever watched the so called german trilogy by director Liliana Cavani. One of those films is "The night porter". If we look at some Charlotte Ramplig's shots
here

https://www.megamodo.com/200949066-liliana-cavani-torna-a-parlare-de-il-portiere-di-notte/

we could find some similarities with Yoshiki's androginous look in the shots with Sakurai Atsushi we were just talking about .

The film was released in 1975 also in Japan

https://www.discogs.com/Daniele-Paris-%E6%84%9B%E3%81%AE%E5%B5%90-The-Night-Porter-Il-Portiere-Di-Notte-Original-Soundtrack/release/8888402

and one of the other three films of german trilogy was "The Berlin affair" which was released in 1985 and was based on novel "The Buddhist Cross" of japanese writer Tanizaki, which makes me think that - perhaps - at that time these films could be quite known in Japan.

It's only a hypothesis, but could be...

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Offline returner

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Reply #201 on: April 20, 2018, 01:20:23 PM

I remember reading an article about nazi symbols in visual kei bands. From what I remember, until mid 90's japanese poeple didn't have too much information about what nazism really was and some bands used swastikas just to "appear rebel", like if it was some kind of "punk" stuff.
 

That will never make sense to me. The Japanese were directly involved with Germany in WWII. That to me just shows that they were so ashamed of their past that they chose to leave it out of the history books as time went forward.

We choose to give Japan a pass saying they were ignorant but how?? However... I will say, that those following the war (40s Japan, 50s Japan) are the ones responisble for the ignorance of those following, up to today.

I love the country of Japan and Japanese culture but it has a habit of doing that.... Like what they did with S. Korea's comfort women. They won't acknowledge what they did. Only very few soldiers who carry their shame will openly apologize.

They could learn a lesson from Germany in regards to their involvement with WWII, but I guess that will be up to the younger generation opening their ears to the world more so than anything else at this point.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2018, 02:01:22 PM by returner »

We are not trying to keep the legacy—we are trying to move forward, so our sound is going to change. I’m ready to be criticized, for example by fans saying "you should rather be this style." I’m ready for it, I’m okay with any concept of criticism-Yoshiki


Teemeah

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Reply #202 on: April 20, 2018, 01:29:52 PM
Just in:

Quote
Get ready. I'll be answering your questions on Twitter tomorrow at 3-4pm PDT for #CoachellaQs
#AskYoshiki from #XJapan #Coachella @TwitterMusic @Coachella
https://twitter.com/YoshikiOfficial

https://www.facebook.com/YoshikiOfficial/photos/a.368480926524228.85046.148183251887331/1742401402465500/?type=3&theater



Offline matsumoto

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Reply #203 on: April 20, 2018, 03:37:12 PM
I was wondering whether Yoshiki and the band ever watched the so called german trilogy by director Liliana Cavani. One of those films is "The night porter". If we look at some Charlotte Ramplig's shots
here

https://www.megamodo.com/200949066-liliana-cavani-torna-a-parlare-de-il-portiere-di-notte/

The Night Porter was hugely popular in Japan back in the day, or so it seems. I've seen Japanese artists quote it as one of their inspirations for songwriting and aesthetics multiple times over the years. In the Jrock scene you've got Buck-Tick's guitarist Imai, who is seemingly a big fan of the film. One of his songs in their latest album opens just like this: The night porter, he gazed upon the gigantic tooth-edged gears (...) So I believe your hunch is more than correct!

They could learn a lesson from Germany in regards to their involvement with WWII, but I guess that will be up to the younger generation opening their ears to the world more so than anything else at this point.

Couldn't agree more with your entire post!

Funny how distance can influence things. Here in central Europe we're extremely cautious when we talk about all things WW2-related. Here in France, for instance, talking about the Occupation is okay, but mentioning that Vichy France was once aligned with Nazi Germany is kind of taboo. Saying things like "grammar nazi" out loud might be okay elsewhere, but it might just as well earn you an uncomfotable laugh from your German friends. Likewise, communist jokes and "in Soviet Russia" jokes are widely tolerated over here, which is not the case at all in Eastern Europe. Call a Russian bro a commie if he disagrees with the lastest liberal trend and he'll likely give you an awkward side-eye.




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Reply #204 on: April 20, 2018, 03:47:49 PM
The Japanese deny much of their wrongdoings in the past and not just WWI. If you look at the occupation of Korea between 1910 and 1945, they did horrible things there... Not just practically trying to erase Korean culture by japanifying the whole penninsula (forbiding to use Korean language in newspapers/media/textbooks, mandatory Japanese name for everyone, demolishing historical buildings and artifacts etc), they had labor camps and there is the issue of comfort women, women who were practically abducted or lured into military camps with promises of "work" and kept there against their will to serve Japanese soldiers as prostitutes. Japan has not admitted to any of these publically, even though there is significant historical evidence of what they had done, it's all documented and even filmed in a lot of cases... They live in denial, so I am not surprised that WWII nazi symbols are freely used. To the majority of the younger generation, these things are never properly taught, out of "national pride".



Offline Feudal

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Reply #205 on: April 20, 2018, 11:50:43 PM
When asked if X Japan will do another American tour, Yoshiki replies: "Depends on the reactions from tomorrow night's #XJapan performance at @Coachella. Thanx for your support. Come see us!"

(https://twitter.com/YoshikiOfficial/status/987461012847652865)

lol pretty frustrating answer. I mean, you aren't going to naturally find a lot of fans at that festival for multiple reasons (completely different genre/musical offering/different scene, the cost just to attend, etc). I hope he's not serious. I think they should reflect on the turnout for 2010 and they'll see they nearly filled 1,500-2,000 capacity theatres around North America. With more promotion and the launch of the new album, that should be no issue to do again.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2018, 11:59:42 PM by Feudal »



Offline LEMONedMe

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Reply #206 on: April 20, 2018, 11:55:05 PM
Yea they need a new album out for people to buy and they need to market the hell out of it with a lot of radio play if possible.  At least on itunes, etc.  Push, push, push! Do not rely on Coachella, FFS!!!

Sometimes our tears blinded the love
We lost out dreams along the way
But I never thought you'd trade your soul to the fates
Never thought you'd leave me alone


Offline lakeisle

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Reply #207 on: April 21, 2018, 12:39:55 AM
As regards nazi symbols of course I think as well they were not used for their political meaning, but  because their sadomasochistic implications met somehow with some bands's topics (for exemple "Sadistic desire").
I was wondering whether Yoshiki and the band ever watched the so called german trilogy by director Liliana Cavani. One of those films is "The night porter". If we look at some Charlotte Ramplig's shots


As you know, "Sadistic Desire" was composed by HIDE, but the lyrics were written by Yoshiki. The lyrics are really sadomasochistic as well as that of "Rose of Pain".

Yoshiki said in his interview that he was impressed with the movie "Blue Velvet", and wrote the lyrics to "Sadistic Desire".

http://www.xjapantranslations.com/rockinf-1988-june-issue
ㄴ Here is the interview translated into English.

Yoshiki seems to have been fascinated by David Lynch. He even asked David Lynch to direct his music video for "Longing". I speculate David Lynch was one of Yoshiki's idols like KISS, David Bowie, Sex Pistols, etc. When I first heard that David Lynch directed the MV "Longing", I screamed... Wow! Yoshiki met his hero again? He is a successful fan. How wonderful his life is!

But, apparently, the MV was not released officially for unknown reasons. And Yoshiki never mentions David Lynch. It's a bit odd given that how much he boasts his relationship with celebrities like Marilyn Manson or KISS, and even brief encounters with Michael Jackson or Bill Gates. I speculate something happened between him and the director. Haha!   

Anyway, you can see the MV.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxx4Dzb3YB8



Offline returner

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Reply #208 on: April 21, 2018, 12:41:04 AM
When asked if X Japan will do another American tour, Yoshiki replies: "Depends on the reactions from tomorrow night's #XJapan performance at @Coachella. Thanx for your support. Come see us!"

(https://twitter.com/YoshikiOfficial/status/987461012847652865)

lol pretty frustrating answer. I mean, you aren't going to naturally find a lot of fans at that festival for multiple reasons (completely different genre/musical offering/different scene, the cost just to attend, etc). I hope he's not serious. I think they should reflect on the turnout for 2010 and they'll see they nearly filled 1,500-2,000 capacity theatres around North America. With more promotion and the launch of the new album, that should be no issue to do again.

I don't think he's serious. I think he's just trying to hype the show he's already got coming up instead of committing to one that's not even on the table yet.

We are not trying to keep the legacy—we are trying to move forward, so our sound is going to change. I’m ready to be criticized, for example by fans saying "you should rather be this style." I’m ready for it, I’m okay with any concept of criticism-Yoshiki


Offline lakeisle

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Reply #209 on: April 21, 2018, 04:12:01 AM
Guys, I read your opinions on war crimes very interestingly. I have tons of things I want to add but holding back, I'd like to post just one thing. It's not very widely known even to Korean fans. I learned it a few days ago. 

In 2006, Toshl performed for the comfort women in Korea. The link to the related article is not found because it is outdated, but there are screenshots of it. In the article, it is written that some of the performance's profit will be donated to the comfort women's community.

And a clip of the performance remains. Toshl sang a traditional Korean song called "The Spring of Home" playing the piano. He sang in Korean and you can hear the audience(comfort women) sang along. Here is the link.   

https://tv.kakao.com/channel/9262/cliplink/384750012

Thank you, Toshl. Korean fans love you.